Studies in Philosophy and Education

, Volume 22, Issue 3–4, pp 245–265 | Cite as

Peters' Non-Instrumental Justification of Education View Revisited: Contesting the Philosophy of Outcomes-based Education in South Africa

  • Yusef Waghid
Article

Abstract

In this article I argue that Outcomes-basedEducation is conceptually trapped in aninstrumentally justifiable view of education. Icontend that the notion of Outcomes-basedEducation is incommensurable with anon-instrumental justification of educationview as explained by RS Peters (1998). Theprocess of specifying outcomes in educationaldiscourse lends itself to manipulation andcontrol and thereby makes the idea ofOutcomes-based Education educationallyimpoverished. In this article an argument ismade for education through rational reflectionand imagination which can complement anOutcomes-based Education system for the reasonthat it finds expression in a non-instrumentaljustifiable view of education.

imagination justification outcomes-based education rational reflection transformation and South Africa 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yusef Waghid
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Education Policy Studies, Faculty of EducationUniversity of StellenboschMatielandSouth Africa

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