European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 109, Issue 3, pp 195–219 | Cite as

Plant Viruses Transmitted by Whiteflies

  • David R. Jones
Article

Abstract

One-hundred and fourteen virus species are transmitted by whiteflies (family Aleyrodidae). Bemisia tabaci transmits 111 of these species while Trialeurodes vaporariorum and T. abutilonia transmit three species each. B. tabaci and T. vaporariorum are present in the European–Mediterranean region, though the former is restricted in its distribution. Of the whitefly-transmitted virus species, 90% belong to the Begomovirus genus, 6% to the Crinivirus genus and the remaining 4% are in the Closterovirus, Ipomovirus or Carlavirus genera. Other named, whitefly-transmitted viruses that have not yet been ranked as species are also documented. The names, abbreviations and synonyms of the whitefly-transmitted viruses are presented in tabulated form together with details of their whitefly vectors, natural hosts and distribution. Entries are also annotated with references. Whitefly-transmitted viruses affecting plants in the European–Mediterranean region have been highlighted in the text.

whitefly-transmitted viruses Begomovirus Crinivirus Closterovirus Carlavirus Ipomovirus Bemisia tabaci Trialeurodes vaporariorum Trialeurodes abutilonea Trialeurodes ricini 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Health Group, Central Science LaboratoryDepartment for Environment, Food and Rural AffairsSand HuttonUK

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