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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 45–89 | Cite as

Refiguring the Archaeology of Greater Cahokia

  • Timothy R. Pauketat
Article

Abstract

Revised theoretical constructs and an enlarged database allow substantive revisions to a processual accounting of greater Cahokia. Measures of political consolidation, demographic nucleation, central transformations, and centrifugal dispersions reveal the form, scale, and developmental trajectory of greater Cahokia to have been highly centralized, regional, and punctuated by abrupt and pervasive social changes, respectively. Social restructuring, political rituals, and large-scale labor mobilizations are recognizable among the archaeological remains, as are the pre-Mississippian traditions that tempered regional government. Greater Cahokia was a product of local agricultural populations dominated and accommodated over three centuries. The processes of domination and accommodation, occurring at a time when regional administration was not yet commonplace, left unmistakable regional and panregional signatures.

Cahokia Mississippian chiefdoms native America 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy R. Pauketat
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology, 380 MFACState University of New York—BuffaloBuffaloNew York

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