Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 351–375

The Attitudes Towards Dating Violence Scales: Development and Initial Validation

  • E. Lisa Price
  • E. Sandra Byers
  • Nicole Belliveau
  • Robert Bonner
  • Bruno Caron
  • Daniel Doiron
  • Jan Greenough
  • Alice Guerette-Breau
  • Leslie Hicks
  • Aline Landry
  • Brigitte Lavoie
  • Margaret Layden-Oreto
  • Linda Legere
  • Suzanne Lemieux
  • Marie-Berthe Lirette
  • Gabrielle Maillet
  • Carol McMullin
  • Rebecca Moore
Article

Abstract

This study describes the development and validation of three Attitudes Towards Male Dating Violence (AMDV) Scales and three Attitudes Towards Female Dating Violence (AFDV) Scales. These scales measure attitudes toward use of psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence, respectively, by boys and by girls. Eight hundred twenty-three students from grades 7, 9, and 11 participated in the validation study. All six scales have good internal consistencies. As predicted, students were more accepting of girls' use of violence than of boys' use of violence, and boys were more accepting of violence than were girls. The six scales were positively correlated with traditional attitudes toward gender roles and with each other, providing evidence for their construct validity. Higher scores on the AMDV Scales were related to boys' past use of violence in dating relationships and to their having aggressive friends, supporting their criterion-related validity. Higher scores on the AFDV Scales were associated with girls' past use of dating violence but not with their having aggressive friends, providing partial support for their criterion-related validity. Singly or in combination, the Attitudes Towards Dating Violence Scales can be used to increase our understanding of the development and maintenance of violence-supportive attitudes in adolescents of all ages.

dating violence attitudes toward violence adolescents 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Lisa Price
    • 1
  • E. Sandra Byers
    • 2
  • Nicole Belliveau
    • 3
  • Robert Bonner
    • 3
  • Bruno Caron
    • 3
  • Daniel Doiron
    • 3
  • Jan Greenough
    • 3
  • Alice Guerette-Breau
    • 3
  • Leslie Hicks
    • 3
  • Aline Landry
    • 3
  • Brigitte Lavoie
    • 3
  • Margaret Layden-Oreto
    • 3
  • Linda Legere
    • 3
  • Suzanne Lemieux
    • 3
  • Marie-Berthe Lirette
    • 3
  • Gabrielle Maillet
    • 3
  • Carol McMullin
    • 3
  • Rebecca Moore
    • 3
  1. 1.University of New BrunswickFrederictonCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of New BrunswickFrederictonCanada
  3. 3.Dating Violence Research TeamCanada

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