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Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 257–277 | Cite as

Dislike and Envy as Antecedents of Pleasure at Another's Misfortune

  • Shlomo Hareli
  • Bernard Weiner
Article

Abstract

Previous research related to pleasure at another's misfortune has focused on the role of envy and competition in inducing such feelings. Additionally, some views assume that this emotion is restricted to mild misfortunes. In this paper, we propose that other-directed negative emotions (e.g., dislike and anger), independent of envy, can give rise to pleasure at another's misfortune and the misfortune can be severe when these other emotions are causal. In addition to providing support for this view in three studies, pleasure at another's misfortune was also associated with different factors when other-directed negative emotions as opposed to envy served as its eliciting condition. For example, given that dislike caused pleasure at another's misfortune, the misfortune was more likely to be perceived as deserved, any misfortune was pleasing, and the observer was more reluctant to help than given envy as the cause.

pleasure at another's misfortune other-directed negative emotions deservingness 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shlomo Hareli
    • 1
  • Bernard Weiner
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of BusinessUniversity of Haifa, Mount CarmelHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos Angeles

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