Educational Psychology Review

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 75–96 | Cite as

Design Principles for Distributed Knowledge Building Processes

  • Jim Hewitt
  • Marlene Scardamalia

Abstract

In this paper we explore various interpretations of the term “distributed cognition,” then turn our attention to communities grounded in the practice of collaborative knowledge building. We discuss CSILE (Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments), a technology designed to support contributions to a communal database. Shared responsibility for this community resource extends to aspects of school practice typically handled exclusively by teachers, and engagement in improving and connecting the contents of the database makes the process of knowledge building self-sustaining. We discuss knowledge building communities involving students and teachers, and end with discussion of design principles for distributed knowledge building processes.

learning environment distributed cognition knowledge building 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jim Hewitt
    • 1
  • Marlene Scardamalia
  1. 1.Centre for Applied Cognitive ScienceOntario Institute for Studies in EducationCanada

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