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Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 431–446 | Cite as

Dating Violence in Two High School Samples: Discriminating Variables

  • Annmarie Cano
  • Sarah Avery-Leaf
  • Michele Cascardi
  • K. Daniel O'LearyEmail author
Article

Abstract

Given that dating violence is a serious problem for adolescents, research is needed to inform dating violence prevention programs which often target correlates of violence. The current two studies examined the multivariate correlates of dating violence in two high schools. The Riggs and O'Leary (1989) model of courtship aggression was used to select a number of variables that are most amenable to change through prevention and intervention strategies. Multivariate analyses, although showing similar discriminating variables for males and females, yielded slightly different patterns of predictors of male and female dating violence. The results have implications for the development of high school-based dating violence prevention programs and for the further examination of sex differences in dating violence.

dating violence adolescents high school students sex differences discriminant function analysis 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annmarie Cano
    • 1
  • Sarah Avery-Leaf
    • 2
  • Michele Cascardi
    • 3
  • K. Daniel O'Leary
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University at Stony BrookStony Brook
  2. 2.VA Medical CenterTogus
  3. 3.Arbor, Inc.Media

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