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Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 259–278 | Cite as

Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement

  • Linda M. Hartling
  • Tracy Luchetta
Article

Abstract

This paper describes the development of a self-report scale to assess the internal experience of humiliation. After defining the construct, an item pool of 149 items was generated, utilizing a five-point Likert scale response format. A sample of 253 individuals ages 15 to 51 (M= 20.66) was used to conduct the item trial. The item pool was evaluated through item and factor analyses. Factor analysis identified two correlated factors accounting for 58% of scale variability. The 20 items loading on factor one were labeled the Fear of Humiliation Subscale and the 12 items loading on factor two were labeled the Cumulative Humiliation Subscale. The full scale of 32 items is called the Humiliation Inventory. Reliability analyses indicate that the subscales and the full scale have high internal consistency. Exploratory analyses of mean scores across six demographic groups indicate significant differences between male and female mean scores on the total scale and the two subscales.

humiliation assessment scale Relational/Cultural Model 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda M. Hartling
    • 1
  • Tracy Luchetta
    • 2
  1. 1.Stone Center at Wellesley CollegeWellesley
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin-Green BayGreen Bay

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