Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 131–137

An Expanded Version of the Multnomah Community Ability Scale: Anchors and Interview Probes for the Assessment of Adults with Serious Mental Illness

  • Faith B. Dickerson
  • Andrea E. Origoni
  • Andrea Pater
  • Barrie K. Friedman
  • William M. Kordonski
Article

Abstract

Objective clinical assessments are important in psychiatric settings to assess patients' functioning and the outcome of rehabilitation interventions. We developed anchors of the Multnomah Community Ability Scale (MCAS) and tested the inter-rater reliability of the expanded instrument. Twenty patients receiving psychiatric rehabilitation services participated in a structured interview and were rated by two raters. Intraclass correlation coefficients were .96 for the total and .87–.99 for the subscale scores. The expanded MCAS can serve as a reliable assessment tool.

evaluation instrument community functioning 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Barker, S., Barron, N., McFarland, B.H., & Bigelow, D.A. (1994a). A community ability scale for chronically mentally ill consumers: part I, reliability and validity. Community Mental Health Journal 30: 363‐ 379.Google Scholar
  2. Barker, S., Barron, N., McFarland, B.H., & Bigelow, D.A. (1994b). Multnomah Community Ability Scale: User's manual. Multnomah County, Oregon: Mental Health and Development Disability Services Division and Office of Mental Health Services.Google Scholar
  3. Barker, S., Barron, N., McFarland, B.H., & Carahan, T. (1994). A community ability scale for chronically mentally ill consumers: part II, applications. Community Mental Health Journal 30:459‐ 472.Google Scholar
  4. Cook, J.A. & Jonikas, J.A. (1996). Outcome of psychiatric rehabilitation service delivery. New Directions for Mental Health Services 71: 33‐ 47.Google Scholar
  5. Dickerson, F.B. (1997). Assessing clinical outcomes: the community functioning of persons with serious mental illness. Psychiatric Services 48: 897‐ 902.Google Scholar
  6. Dickerson, F.B., Parente, F., & Ringel, N. (2000). The relationship among three measures of social functioning in outpatients with schizophrenia. Journal of Clinical Psychology 56: 1509‐ 1519.Google Scholar
  7. Fleiss, J.L. (1981). Statistical Methods for Rates and Proportions, Second Edition. New York: John Wiley and Sons.Google Scholar
  8. Lehman, A.F. (1997). Evaluating outcomes of treatments for persons with psychotic disorders. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 57 Suppl 11: 61‐ 67.Google Scholar
  9. O'Malia, L.O., McFarland, B.H., Barker, S., & Barron, N.M. (2002). A level‐ of‐ function self‐ report measure for consumers with severe mental illness. Psychiatric Services 53: 326‐ 331.Google Scholar
  10. Shon, S.P., Cirsmon, M.L., Toprac, M.G., Trivedi, M., Miller A.L., Suppes, T., & Rush, A.J. (1999). Mental health care from the public perspective: the Texas Medication Algorithim Project. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 60 Suppl 3:16‐ 20.Google Scholar
  11. Srebnik, D., Hendryx, M., Stevenson, J., Caverly, S., Dyck, D.G.,& Cauce, A.M. (1997). Development of outcome indicators for monitoring the quality of public mental health care. Psychiatric Services 48: 903‐ 909.Google Scholar
  12. Wallace, C.J., Liberman, R.P., Taylor, R., & Wallace, J. (2000). The Independent Living Skills Survey: a comprehensive measure of the community functioning of severely and persistently mentally ill individuals. Schizophrenia Bulletin 26:631‐ 58.Google Scholar
  13. Zani, B., McFarland, B., Wachal, M., Barker, S., & Barron, N. (1999). Statewide replication of predictive validity for the Multnomah Community Ability Scale. Community Mental Health Journal 35: 223‐ 229.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Faith B. Dickerson
    • 1
  • Andrea E. Origoni
    • 1
  • Andrea Pater
    • 1
  • Barrie K. Friedman
    • 2
  • William M. Kordonski
    • 3
  1. 1.Sheppard Pratt Health SystemBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.St. Luke's House, Inc.BethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Alliance, Inc.BaltimoreUSA

Personalised recommendations