Advertisement

Pharmacy World and Science

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 37–50 | Cite as

Progress in Practice; UKCPA Residential Symposium, Hilton Hotel, Manchester, UK. Friday, 17-Sunday, 19 May 2002

Abstract List
  • 37 Downloads

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Anon. Facing the recruitment and retention crisis in pharmacy: looking abroad. Pharm J 2001; 276: 45–46.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cousins D, Luscombe D. Forces for change and the evolution of clinical pharmacy practice. Pharm J 1995; 255: 771–776.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dosaj R, Mistry R. The pharmacy technician in clinical services. Hosp Pharm 1998; 5(1): 26–28.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Dhillon S, Duggan C, Pearsall K, et al. An evaluation of interventions of a major significance in North West Thames. CPD Pharmacy 2000; 1: 12–18.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Liebelt E L, DeAngelis C D. Evolving Trends and Treatment Advances in Pediatric Poisoning. Journal of the American Medical Association 1999; 282 (12): 1113–1115.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Shannon M. Ingestion of Toxic Substances by Children. New England Journal of Medicine 2000; 342: 186–191.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Breitigan J M. Protecting children in the community from poisons. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy 1998; 55: 1971–1973.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ernest S, Stremski M D. Accidental Pediatric Ingestion, Hospital Charges and Failure to Utilize a Poison Control Center. Wisconsin Medical Journal 1999; 29–33.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Information from the National Poisons Information Service. CMO's Update – a communication to all doctors from the Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health. 2000; 25: 3.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Personal Communication with Alison Dines, London Poisons Unit, May 2000.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Tempowski J. Epidemiology of Poisoning in Children from Paediatric Toxicology: Handbook of Poisoning in Children 1997 edited by N Bates, N Edwards, J Roper, G Volans. Publ. Macmillan Reference Ltd.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Cancer in Scotland Action for Change. Scottish Executive. 2001.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cancer Scenarios: an aid to planning cancer services in Scotland in the next decade. Scottish Executive. May 2001.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Booth CD. Pharmacist-managed anticoagulant clinics: a review. Pharm J 1998; 261: 623–625.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bozovich M et al. Effect of a clinical pharmacist-managed lipid clinic on achieving national cholesterol education programme low-density lipoprotein goals. Pharmacotherapy 2000; 20(11): 1375–1383.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bonadonna G, Valagussa P. Dose-Response Effect of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer. NEJM. 1981; 304: 10–15.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Blenkinsopp, A., Tann, J and Platts, A. A method for distinguishing leading edge practitioners – a case study in community pharmacy. Journal of social and administrative pharmacy 1999; 16(3/4): 186–197.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    . Tann, J., Blenkinsopp, A., Allen, J. and Platts, A. Leading edge practitioners in community pharmacy: approaches to innovation. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice 1996; 4(4): 235–245.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Anon. Which NSAID? Drug Ther Bull 1987; 25: 81–84.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance on the use of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-II selective inhibitors, celecoxib, rofecoxib, meloxicam and etodolac for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. July 2001, Technology Appraisal Guidance No. 27. www.nice.org.ukGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Brooks P, Emery P, Evans JF et al. Interpreting the clinical significance of the differential inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. Rheumatol (Oxford) 1999; 38: 779–88.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bombardier C, Laine L, Reicin A et al. Comparison of upper gastrointestinal toxicity of rofecoxib and naproxen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (VIGOR study). N Engl J Med 2000; 343: 1520–28.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Silverstein FE, Faich G, Goldstein J et al. Gastrointestinal toxicity with celecoxib vs NSAIDs for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: the CLASS study-a randomised controlled trial. JAMA 2000; 284: 1247–55.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    World Health Organisation (1994). Assessment of fracture risk and its application to screening for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Technical Report Series 843. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    National Service Framework for Older People. London: Department of Health; March 2001.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Royal College of Physicians. Osteoporosis. Clinical guidelines for prevention and treatment. London: The College; 1999.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    American College of Rheumatology. Recommendations for the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Arthritis and Rheumatism 1996; 39: 1791–1801.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gennari C, Martini G, Nuti R. Secondary osteoporosis. Ageing (milano) 1998; 10: 214–24.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Eastell R, Reid DM, et al. A UK consensus group management of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: an update. J Intern Med 1998; 244: 271–292.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    van Staa TP, Leufkens HGM, et al. Oral corticosteroids and fracture risk:-relationship to daily and cumulative doses. Rheum 2000; 39: 1383–9.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Osteoporosis. Prevention, diagnosis and therapy. NIH Consensus Statement Online 2000 March 27–29; 17: 1–36.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Feldkamp J, Becker A, White O, et al. Long term anticonvulsant therapy leads to low bone mineral density-evidence for direct drug effects of phenytoin and carbamazepine on human osteoblast like cells. Exp Clin Endocrin Diabetes 2000; 108: 37–43.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Scottish Office. Scotland's Health: a challenge to us all. Edinburgh: HMSO, 1992.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    2. Lanarkshire Primary Care NHS Trust Clinical Governance Report Year 2 2001.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Scottish Office Department of Health. Scotland's Health: Scottish Health Survey 1998. Edinburgh: The Stationery Office; 2000.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Joint British recommendations on prevention of coronary heart disease in clinical practice. BMJ Publishing Group Supplement 2 December 1998 Vol. 80.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    World Health Organisation (Europe) and International Diabetes Federation (Europe). Diabetes Care and Research in Europe; the St Vincent Declaration Diab.et Med. 1990; 7: 360–370.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    NHS Executive. The NHS Plan, 2000.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    NHS Executive. Pharmacy in the Future – implementing the NHS Plan; A programme for pharmacy in the National Health Service, 2000.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. Medicines and Ethics Guide for Pharmacists. Pharmaceutical Press, 2000.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Whiddett, S. and Hollyford, S. (2000) The Competencies Handbook. 1st ed, London, Institute of Personnel and Development, 2000.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Miller, GE. The assessment of clinical skills/competence/performance. Acad Med 1990, 65 563–67.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    McRobbie, D. & Davies, G. (1996) Assessing clinical competence – a new method of evaluating hospital pre-registration trainees. Pharmaceutical Journal, 256 908–910.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Personalised recommendations