AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 13–21 | Cite as

Differences in Risk Behavior and Sources of AIDS Information Among Gay, Bisexual, and Straight-Identified Men Who Have Sex with Men

  • Gary Goldbaum
  • Tom Perdue
  • Richard Wolitski
  • Cornelis Rietmeijer
  • Allan Hedrich
  • Robert Wood
  • Martin Fishbein
  • David Cohn
  • Nan Corby
  • Anne Freeman
  • Carolyn Guenther-Grey
  • John Sheridan
  • Susan Tross
Article

Abstract

At public sex environments in four U.S. cities, 1,369 men who have sex with men (MSM) were asked about sexual self-identification, recent HIV risk behaviors, and exposures to HIV information. Half of respondents (n = 687) self-identified as gay, 40% (n = 546) as bisexual, and 10% (n = 136) as straight. Ninety-nine percent of both gay and bisexual MSM and 96% of straight MSM reported oral sex with men; 94%, 68%, and 46%, respectively, reported anal sex with men, while 62%, 98%, and 97%, respectively, reported vaginal sex with women. Recent exposure to any HIV information was reported by 96%, 91%, and 89% respectively of gay, bisexual, and straight MSM; gay MSM were most likely to get HIV information from talking with someone. However, television was the only medium to reach more than half of gay, bisexual, and straight MSM. Non-gay-identified MSM and their partners are at high risk for HIV transmission, but more study is needed to identify the most effective channels for conveying risk reduction messages to this population.

Media information gay bisexual straight 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary Goldbaum
    • 1
  • Tom Perdue
    • 1
  • Richard Wolitski
    • 2
  • Cornelis Rietmeijer
    • 3
  • Allan Hedrich
    • 4
  • Robert Wood
    • 1
    • 12
  • Martin Fishbein
    • 5
  • David Cohn
    • 6
  • Nan Corby
    • 7
  • Anne Freeman
    • 8
  • Carolyn Guenther-Grey
    • 9
  • John Sheridan
    • 10
  • Susan Tross
    • 11
  1. 1.Seattle-King County Department of Public HealthAIDS Prevention ProjectSeattle
  2. 2.Division of HIV and AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Behavioral Intervention Research BranchAtlanta
  3. 3.Denver Department of Public HealthDenver AIDS PreventionDenver
  4. 4.Evanjelicke LyceumBratislava
  5. 5.Public Policy Center, The Annenberg School for CommunicationUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia
  6. 6.Denver Department of Public HealthAIDS Community Demonstration ProjectsDenver
  7. 7.AIDS Community Demonstration ProjectsCalifornia State UniversityLong Beach
  8. 8.Dallas County Health DepartmentAIDS Community Demonstration ProjectsDallas
  9. 9.Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAIDS Community Demonstration ProjectsAtlanta
  10. 10.AIDS Community Demonstration Projects. Conwal, Inc.Falls Church
  11. 11.National Development and Research InstituteAIDS Community Demonstration ProjectsNew York
  12. 12.Seattle-King County Department of Public HealthAIDS Community Demonstration ProjectsSeattle

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