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Women in the Czech Republic: Feminism, Czech Style

  • Marianne A. Ferber
  • Phyllis Hutton Raabe
Article

Abstract

Many years after the Velvet Revolution, feminism remains close to a dirty word in the Czech Republic, even among women who share the views of “Western feminists.” Surprisingly, this may in part hark back to the negative views of “bourgeois feminism” propounded by the Communists. Equally surprising is the very high proportion of women who are employed, almost all of them full-time, although they continue to do the lion's share of homemaking. This strategy enables Czech women to have a high sense of personal efficacy and independence. This paper emphasizes the historical roots of women's position in Czech society, and the importance of the cultural and social context for the emergence of what we term “Feminism, Czech Style.”

feminism gender equality family policies Czech women Czech Republic 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marianne A. Ferber
    • 1
  • Phyllis Hutton Raabe
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignChampaign
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of New OrleansNew Orleans

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