Autonomous Robots

, Volume 14, Issue 2–3, pp 179–197 | Cite as

Robonaut: A Robot Designed to Work with Humans in Space

  • William Bluethmann
  • Robert Ambrose
  • Myron Diftler
  • Scott Askew
  • Eric Huber
  • Michael Goza
  • Fredrik Rehnmark
  • Chris Lovchik
  • Darby Magruder

Abstract

The Robotics Technology Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center is developing robotic systems to assist astronauts in space. One such system, Robonaut, is a humanoid robot with the dexterity approaching that of a suited astronaut. Robonaut currently has two dexterous arms and hands, a three degree-of-freedom articulating waist, and a two degree-of-freedom neck used as a camera and sensor platform. In contrast to other space manipulator systems, Robonaut is designed to work within existing corridors and use the same tools as space walking astronauts. Robonaut is envisioned as working with astronauts, both autonomously and by teleoperation, performing a variety of tasks including, routine maintenance, setting up and breaking down worksites, assisting crew members while outside of spacecraft, and serving in a rapid response capacity.

Robonaut Space Robots dexterous robots human-robot interaction teleoperation autonomous humanoid dexterous hands tool-using robot 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Bluethmann
    • 1
  • Robert Ambrose
    • 2
  • Myron Diftler
    • 3
  • Scott Askew
    • 2
  • Eric Huber
    • 4
  • Michael Goza
    • 2
  • Fredrik Rehnmark
    • 3
  • Chris Lovchik
    • 2
  • Darby Magruder
    • 2
  1. 1.Hernandez Engineering, Inc.HoustonUSA
  2. 2.Robotics Technology BranchNASA Johnson Space CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Automation & Robotics DepartmentLockheed Martin CorporationHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Texas Robotics and Automation Center LabsMetrica, Inc.HoustonUSA

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