Advertisement

Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 69, Issue 1, pp 61–68 | Cite as

Public-Academic Liaison Research Centers in an Era of Managed Care

  • M. Annette Hanson
  • E. L. Stone
  • Walter E. Penk
  • Raymond B. FlanneryJr.
  • Stephen M. Goldfinger
Article

Abstract

Public-Academic Liaison research centers (PALs) have traditionally provided benefits to both state mental health authorities (SMHAs) and academic institutions. The advent of managed care, austere state fiscal budgets, and a restructured national research development capacity suggests the need for new administrative approaches to PAL research efforts to maintain these benefits in this era of rapidly changing health care. This brief report outlines one such approach by the Massachusetts SMHA in its efforts to establish two PAL research centers: one for clinical neuroscience, and one for behavioral and forensic science. Preliminary two-year outcomes are presented, and the implications of the model are discussed.

Keywords

Health Care Mental Health Research Effort Research Center Health Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. 1.
    Talbot JA: State-university collaboration in mental health: An introduction. In Talbot JA (Ed.): The perspectives of John Talbot. New Directions in Mental Health Services 37: 85–95, 1988.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kay J: The influence of curriculum in psychiatry residency education. Psychiatric Quarterly 62: 95–104, 1991.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Yank GR, Barber JW, Vieweg WVR, et al.: Virginia's experience with stateuniversity collaboration. Hospital and Community Psychiatry 42: 39–43, 1991.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Neligh G, Shore JH, Scully J, et al.: The program for public psychiatry: State university collaboration in Colorado. Hospital and Community Psychiatry 42: 44–48, 1991.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Santos AB, Ballenger JC, Bevilacqua JJ, et al.: A community-based publicacademic liaison program. American Journal of Psychiatry 151: 1181–1187, 1994.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Weintraub W: The Maryland Plan: A decade of university-state collaboration. New Directions for Mental Health Services 42: 31–62, 1989.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Harbin HT, Weintraub W, Nyman GW, et al.: Psychiatric manpower and public mental health: Maryland's experience. Hospital and Community Psychiatry 33: 277–281, 1982.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Talbot JA: State-university collaboration in mental health: Lessons learned. In Talbot JA (Ed.): The perspectives of John Talbot. New Directions in Mental Health Services 37: 97–104, 1988.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Duck JD: Managing change: The art of balancing. Harvard Business Review November–December, 109–118, 1993.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hanson MA, Stone EL, Flannery RB Jr.: Residency training in Massachusetts: A new approach to state-university collaboration. Journal of Mental Health Administration, 24: 103–107, 1997.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Annette Hanson
    • 1
  • E. L. Stone
    • 1
  • Walter E. Penk
    • 1
  • Raymond B. FlanneryJr.
    • 1
  • Stephen M. Goldfinger
    • 1
  1. 1.The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health and Harvard Medical School/The University of Massachusetts Medical School. Massachusetts Department of Medical AssistanceUSA

Personalised recommendations