Correlates of Drug Testing Attitudes in a Sample of Blue Collar Workers

  • Sarah Moore
  • Leon Grunberg
  • Ed Greenberg
Article

Abstract

Using responses from 1429 workers employed in the wood products industry, we examine the relationship between drug testing (DT) attitudes and several demographic, organizational, job attitude, and job outcome variables. After controlling for age and marital status, analyses revealed moderate correlations between DT attitudes and alcohol and drug variables, DT program characteristics, organizational, and work attitude variables. DT attitudes were weakly but significantly related to absences, late work arrivals, accidents, and injuries. Implications of the findings and future research suggestions are discussed.

drug testing attitudes blue collar workers job outcomes 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Moore
    • 1
  • Leon Grunberg
    • 2
  • Ed Greenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Puget SoundTacoma
  2. 2.Department of Comparative SociologyUniversity of Puget SoundTacoma

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