African Archaeological Review

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 101–132

The First Herders at the Cape of Good Hope

  • Karim Sadr
Article

Abstract

It is generally accepted that the earliest livestock and pottery were brought to the southern tip of Africa by Khoi-speaking herders from northern Botswana around 2000 years ago. The archaeological remains of that age, however, show no sign of such a migration. Rather, some evidence points to the arrival of the Khoi in the southwestern Cape toward the end of the first millennium AD. The earliest livestock and pottery, it is argued, probably reached the Cape of Good Hope some 2000 years ago by a process of diffusion. The implications of this model for the current debates on the transition from hunting to herding in southern Africa are discussed.

Late Stone Age southern Africa herders Khoi migration diffusion 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karim Sadr
    • 1
  1. 1.Archaeology Unit, Department of HistoryUniversity of BotswanaGaboroneBotswana

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