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New Agendas and New Patterns of International NGO Political Action

  • Paul Nelson
Article

Abstract

International advocacy strategies devised for the political environment in which World Bank policy is decided are often not suitable for advocacy on broader financial policy and trade issues. Advocacy in these “new” agendas challenges prevailing models, which depict NGOs as mobilizing powerful governments and international organizations to influence a government's behavior. The patterns of international NGO political activity are diverse, sometimes restraining the power of international rules and authorities over individual governments, and require a new or broader model

NGO advocacy World Bank globalization trade 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Third-Sector Research and The Johns Hopkins University 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, WWPH 3E23University of PittsburghPittsburgh

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