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Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 51, Issue 3, pp 363–372 | Cite as

Light-dependent induction of proline biosynthesis by abscisic acid and salt stress is inhibited by brassinosteroid in Arabidopsis

  • Edit Ábrahám
  • Gábor Rigó
  • Gyöngyi Székely
  • Réka Nagy
  • Csaba Koncz
  • László Szabados
Article

Abstract

Osmotic stress-induced accumulation of proline, an important protective osmolyte in higher plants, is dependent on the expression of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS) and proline dehydrogenase (PDH) enzymes that catalyze the rate-limiting steps of proline biosynthesis and degradation, respectively. Proline metabolism is modulated by differential regulation of organ specific expression of PDH and duplicated P5CS genes in Arabidopsis. Stimulation of proline synthesis by abscisic acid (ABA) and salt stress correlates with a striking activation of P5CS1 expression. By contrast, P5CS2 is only weakly induced, whereas PDH is inhibited to different extent by ABA and salt stress in shoots and roots of light-grown plants. Proline accumulation and light-dependent induction of P5CS1 by ABA and salt stress is inhibited in dark-adapted plants. During dark adaptation P5CS2 is also down-regulated, whereas PDH expression is significantly enhanced in shoots. The inhibitory effect of dark adaptation on P5CS1 is mimicked by the steroid hormone brassinolide. However, brassinolide fails to stimulate PDH, and inhibits P5CS2 only in shoots. Proline accumulation and induction of P5CS1 transcription are simultaneously enhanced in the ABA-hypersensitive prl1 and brassinosteroid-deficient det2 mutants, whereas P5CS2 shows enhanced induction by ABA and salt only in the det2 mutant. In comparison, the prl1 mutation reduces the basal level of PDH expression, whereas the det2 mutation enhances the inhibition of PDH by ABA. Regulation of P5CS1 expression thus appears to play a principal role in controlling proline accumulation stimulated by ABA and salt stress in Arabidopsis.

abscisic acid brassinosteroid P5CS proline biosynthesis salt stress 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edit Ábrahám
    • 1
  • Gábor Rigó
    • 1
  • Gyöngyi Székely
    • 1
  • Réka Nagy
    • 1
  • Csaba Koncz
    • 1
    • 2
  • László Szabados
    • 1
  1. 1.Biological Research Center of Hungarian Academy of SciencesInstitute of Plant BiologySzegedHungary
  2. 2.Max-Planck-Institut für ZüchtungsforschungKölnGermany

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