Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 205–226 | Cite as

Protective Orders and Domestic Violence: Risk Factors for Re-Abuse

  • Matthew J. Carlson
  • Susan D. Harris
  • George W. Holden
Article

Abstract

One of the few legal tools for protecting victims of domestic violence is the civil Protection Order (PO). How effective they were in preventing re-abuse was analyzed by examining court and police records from 210 couples in which female victims (or “applicants”) filed POs against their violent partners. Police records for 2 years prior and two years following the issuance of a PO were reviewed. Results indicated a significant decline in the probability of abuse following a PO. Prior to filing a PO, 68% of the women reported physical violence. After filing, only 23% reported physical violence. Several risk factors were assessed and it was found that very low SES women were more likely to report re-abuse as were African-Americans.

domestic violence protective order legal intervention physical violence 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew J. Carlson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Susan D. Harris
    • 1
    • 3
  • George W. Holden
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.University of Texas at AustinAustin
  2. 2.Health InstituteRutgers UniversityNew Brunswick
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyNorthern Arizona UniversityFlagstaff
  4. 4.Department of Psychology and the Center for Criminology and Criminal Justice ResearchUniversity of Texas at AustinAustin

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