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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 463–472 | Cite as

Utility of Behavior Ratings by Examiners During Assessments of Preschool Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

  • Erik G. Willcutt
  • Cynthia M. Hartung
  • Benjamin B. Lahey
  • Jan Loney
  • William E. Pelham
Article

Abstract

This study examines the clinical utility of behavior ratings made by nonclinician examiners during assessments of preschool children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD). Matched samples of children with (n = 127) and without (n = 125) AD/HD were utilized to test the internal, convergent, concurrent, and incremental validity of ratings completed by examiners on the Hillside Behavior Rating Scale (HBRS). Results indicated that HBRS ratings were internally consistent, possessed sufficient interrater reliability, and were significantly associated with parent and teacher reports of AD/HD when controlling for age, gender, intelligence, and symptoms of other psychopathology. HBRS ratings also were significantly associated with other measures of functioning, and provided a significant increment in the prediction of impairment over parent and teacher report alone. These findings suggest that behavioral ratings during testing provide a unique source of clinical information that may be useful as a supplement to parent and teacher reports.

Keywords

Clinical Information Clinical Utility Preschool Child Interrater Reliability Behavior Rating 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erik G. Willcutt
    • 1
  • Cynthia M. Hartung
    • 2
  • Benjamin B. Lahey
    • 3
  • Jan Loney
    • 4
  • William E. Pelham
    • 5
  1. 1.University of Colorado at BoulderBoulder
  2. 2.Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortland
  3. 3.University of ChicagoChicago
  4. 4.State University of New York at Stony BrookStony Brook
  5. 5.State University of New York at BuffaloBuffalo

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