Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 29, Issue 6, pp 439–484 | Cite as

The Screening and Diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorders

  • Pauline A. Filipek
  • Pasquale J. Accardo
  • Grace T. Baranek
  • Edwin H. CookJr.
  • Geraldine Dawson
  • Barry Gordon
  • Judith S. Gravel
  • Chris P. Johnson
  • Ronald J. Kallen
  • Susan E. Levy
  • Nancy J. Minshew
  • Barry M. Prizant
  • Isabelle Rapin
  • Sally J. Rogers
  • Wendy L. Stone
  • Stuart Teplin
  • Roberto F. Tuchman
  • Fred R. Volkmar

Abstract

The Child Neurology Society and American Academy of Neurology recently proposed to formulate Practice Parameters for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Autism for their memberships. This endeavor was expanded to include representatives from nine professional organizations and four parent organizations, with liaisons from the National Institutes of Health. This document was written by this multidisciplinary Consensus Panel after systematic analysis of over 2,500 relevant scientific articles in the literature. The Panel concluded that appropriate diagnosis of autism requires a dual-level approach: (a) routine developmental surveillance, and (b) diagnosis and evaluation of autism. Specific detailed recommendations for each level have been established in this document, which are intended to improve the rate of early suspicion and diagnosis of, and therefore early intervention for, autism.

Practice parameters diagnosis and evaluation of autism dual-level approach 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pauline A. Filipek
    • 1
  • Pasquale J. Accardo
    • 2
  • Grace T. Baranek
    • 3
  • Edwin H. CookJr.
    • 4
  • Geraldine Dawson
    • 5
  • Barry Gordon
    • 6
  • Judith S. Gravel
    • 7
  • Chris P. Johnson
    • 8
  • Ronald J. Kallen
    • 4
  • Susan E. Levy
    • 9
  • Nancy J. Minshew
    • 10
  • Barry M. Prizant
    • 11
  • Isabelle Rapin
    • 7
  • Sally J. Rogers
  • Wendy L. Stone
    • 13
  • Stuart Teplin
    • 3
  • Roberto F. Tuchman
    • 14
  • Fred R. Volkmar
    • 15
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaIrvineCalifornia
  2. 2.Departments of Pediatrics and NeurologyUniversity of California, Irvine, College of Medicine, UCI Medical CenterOrange
  3. 3.New York Medical CollegeValhalla
  4. 4.University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel Hill
  5. 5.University of ChicagoChicago
  6. 6.Seattle
  7. 7.Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimore
  8. 8.Albert Einstein College of MedicineBronx
  9. 9.University of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan Antonio
  10. 10.University of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphia
  11. 11.University of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburgh
  12. 12.Brown UniversityProvidence
  13. 13.Vanderbilt University Medical CenterNashville
  14. 14.University of Miami School of MedicineCoral Gables
  15. 15.Yale UniversityNew Haven

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