Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 82, Issue 3, pp 265–280 | Cite as

Environmental Monitoring of Carbaryl Applied in Urban Areas to Control the Glassy-winged Sharpshooter in California

  • Johanna Walters
  • Kean S. Goh
  • LinYing Li
  • Hsiao Feng
  • Jorge Hernandez
  • Jane White
Article

Abstract

Carbaryl insecticide was applied by ground spray to plants in urban areas to control a serious insect pest the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca coagulata (Say), newly introduced inCalifornia. To assure there are no adverse impacts to human health and the environment from the carbaryl applications, carbaryl was monitored in tank mixtures, air, surface water, foliage and backyard fruits and vegetables.Results from the five urban areas – Porterville, Fresno, Rancho Cordova, Brentwood and Chico – showed there were no significanthuman exposures or impacts on the environment. Spray tank concentrations ranged from 0.1–0.32%. Carbaryl concentrationsin air ranged from none detected to 1.12 μg m-3, well below the interim health screening level in air of 51.7 μg m-3. There were three detections of carbaryl in surface water nearapplication sites: 0.125 ppb (parts per billion) from a water treatment basin; 6.94 ppb from a gold fish pond; and 1737 ppbin a rain runoff sample collected from a drain adjacent to a sprayed site. The foliar dislodgeable residues ranged from 1.54–7.12 μg cm-2, comparable to levels reported forsafe reentry of 2.4 to 5.6 μg cm-2 for citrus. Carbarylconcentrations in fruits and vegetables ranged from no detectableamounts to 7.56 ppm, which were below the U.S.EPA tolerance, allowable residue of 10 ppm.

carbamate insecticide carbaryl environmentalmonitoring glassy-winged sharpshooter urban monitoring 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johanna Walters
    • 1
  • Kean S. Goh
    • 1
  • LinYing Li
    • 1
  • Hsiao Feng
    • 2
  • Jorge Hernandez
    • 2
  • Jane White
    • 2
  1. 1.California Department of Pesticide RegulationSacramentoU.S.A.
  2. 2.Center for Analytical ChemistrySacramentoU.S.A

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