Review of Economics of the Household

, Volume 1, Issue 1–2, pp 33–58 | Cite as

Agricultural Household Models: Genesis, Evolution, and Extensions

Article

Abstract

This paper offers a synthesis of agricultural household modeling, its evolution and uses; presents a general yet simple agricultural household model, estimated with Mexican village data and programmed using General Algebraic Modeling System software; and uses this model to explore household-level impacts of agricultural policy changes on production and incomes under alternative rural-market scenarios. We point out limitations of household-farm models in heterogeneous rural economies and discuss how to integrate multiple household models into economy-wide models designed to overcome these limitations.

agricultural household models household-farm models computable general equilibrium models Mexico NAFTA 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Agricultural and Resource EconomicsUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Economics and Agricultural and Resource EconomicsUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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