Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 5–24

The Role of Shape and Weight in Self-Concept: The Shape and Weight Based Self-Esteem Inventory

  • Josie Geller
  • Charlotte Johnston
  • Kellianne Madsen

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to establish the psychometric properties of the Shape and Weight Based Self-Esteem (SAWBS) Inventory, a newly-developed measure of the influence of shape and weight on feelings of self-worth. The results from a nonclinical sample of young women indicated that SAWBS scores were stable over time (N = 24), and correlated moderately with one of two measures of shape and weight schemata (N = 50). In a sample of 84 women, SAWBS scores also correlated moderately with two measures of eating disorder symptomatology, and in regression analyses contributed statistically significant unique variances to both measures of symptomatology, even after the effects of body mass index, depression, and global self-esteem were controlled. Finally, SAWBS scores discriminated between women reporting few or no disturbed eating symptoms and possible/probable eating disorder cases. In sum, the SAWBS Inventory is a reliable and valid measure, and may be a useful tool in the assessment of eating disorders.

eating disorders self-esteem 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josie Geller
    • 1
  • Charlotte Johnston
    • 1
  • Kellianne Madsen
    • 1
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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