Globalization and the Status of Current Research on the Indian Nonprofit Sector

  • Siddhartha Sen
Article

Abstract

An overview of recent trends in research on the Indian nonprofit sector is presented. The material is not exhaustive of all research that has been conducted, but instead discusses effects of globalization on the literature. As used here, globalization implies the worldwide rise of economic liberalism, universal trust in political democracy, the advent of cultural universalism, relative erosion of the power of nation-states, and global embracing of capitalism and commodity culture. The following distinct effects of globalization are discussed: diverse policy debates on nongovernmental organization (NGO) roles in development, challenges to the credibility of India's most popular and debated theory of nonprofits, the emergence of a large volume of literature on environmental and women's movements and organizations, and the shifting of attention to the study of NGOs. A deliberate effort is made to identify the backgrounds of some of the authors discussed in the article to direct attention to differences in content of the writings of NGO officials, activists, scholars, policy analysts, development consultants, Westerners, and Indians.

India nonprofit sector globalization nongovernmental organizations 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Third-Sector Research and The Johns Hopkins University 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siddhartha Sen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Architecture and PlanningMorgan State UniversitySiddhartha Sen
  2. 2.Institute of Architecture and PlanningMorgan State UniversityBaltimore

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