Hydrobiologia

, Volume 485, Issue 1–3, pp 209–211 | Cite as

Bromeliad ostracods pass through amphibian (Scinaxax perpusillus) and mammalian guts alive

  • Luiz Carlos S. Lopez
  • Diogo Alvim Gonçalves
  • André Mantovani
  • Ricardo Iglesias Rios
Article

Abstract

During a study about bromeliad tadpoles (Scinax perpusillus), the ability of bromeliad ostracods (genus Elpidium) to pass unharmed through the tadpole gut was documented. Seven Elpidium were found alive inside a tadpole's digestive tract. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that Scinax tadpoles frequently ingest bromeliad ostracods, eliminating them unharmed in the faeces. Another laboratory experiment demonstrated these ostracods'ability to pass through a mammalian (mouse) gut alive. The consequences of this ability in ostracod ecology and evolution is discussed. Biotic and abiotic data from the bromeliads where the ostracods and tadpoles were collected are given.

ostracods bromeliads dispersion phytotelmata Elpidium Scinax 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luiz Carlos S. Lopez
    • 1
  • Diogo Alvim Gonçalves
    • 1
  • André Mantovani
    • 1
  • Ricardo Iglesias Rios
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratório de Comunidades; Departamento de EcologiaUniversidade Federal do Rio de JaneiroRio de Janeiro, RJBrazil

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