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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 47, Issue 5, pp 321–346 | Cite as

The Lessons of Art Theory for Pastoral Theology

  • Donald Capps
Article

Abstract

This essay applies art theory to pastoral theology, using Rudolf Arnheim's views on the compositional structure of paintings to propose models for expressing the relationship of theology and psychology. From a structural feature of paintings, namely, their possession of a depth dimension and a frontal plane, two primary models are derived, convergence and juxtaposition. The viability of a third, structural uniformity, is also recognized. The larger purpose of the essay is to contend for a recovery of pastoral theology's mid-century emphasis on perception.

Keywords

Structural Feature Compositional Structure Frontal Plane Cross Cultural Psychology Primary Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald Capps
    • 1
  1. 1.Princeton Theological SeminaryPrinceton

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