Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 317–349

On Enhancing Teachers' Knowledge by Constructing Cases in Classrooms

  • Pi-Jen Lin
Article

Abstract

This study was designed to enhance teachers' knowledge by constructing cases as part of a school-based professional development project in Taiwan. Cases, involving episodes and issues from real classroom events, were constructed collaboratively by a school-based team consisting of the researcher and four classroom teachers. The process of constructing cases, characterization of teachers' understanding of cases, and their skills for case writing were developed in the course of the study. In the process of constructing these cases, teachers improved their awareness of and their competence in dealing with the difficulties students encountered in the learning of mathematics; they enhanced their pedagogical content knowledge and their ability to reflect on classroom practices.

classroom cases pedagogical content knowledge reflective teaching teacher development 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pi-Jen Lin
    • 1
  1. 1.Mathematics Education DepartmentHsin-Chu CityTaiwan, R.O.C.

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