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Changing Supply and Earning Patterns of the Mental Health Workforce

  • Richard M. Scheffler
  • Susan L. Ivey
  • A. Bowen Garrett
Article

Abstract

The authors examine recent trends in the supply and earnings of various mental health providers from 1989 to 1995. The makeup of the mental health workforce is fundamentally different now than a decade ago. The number and earnings of psychiatrists have been relatively flat. The number of psychologists increased by 24%, with their earnings rising rapidly in the 1980s, and remaining level since 1990. The number of clinically trained social workers increased by 87% over the same period, and the number of advanced practice nurses certified in mental health specialties almost doubled, with the earnings of these master's-level providers increasing steadily over the period described. These trends are discussed in the context of major changes in the financing and delivery of mental health care.

Keywords

Public Health Health Care Mental Health Social Worker Major Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard M. Scheffler
    • 1
  • Susan L. Ivey
    • 1
  • A. Bowen Garrett
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaBerkeley
  2. 2.Health Policy CenterUrban InstituteWashington, DC

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