Human Studies

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 451–462 | Cite as

Stressed Embodiment: Doing Phenomenology in the Wild

  • Maureen Connolly
  • Tom Craig
Article

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maureen Connolly
    • 1
  • Tom Craig
    • 2
  1. 1.Brock UniversitySt. CatharinesCanada
  2. 2.International Communicology InstituteSt. CatharinesCanada

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