Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

, Volume 63, Issue 2–3, pp 231–238 | Cite as

N2O and NO emissions from a field of Chinese cabbage as influenced by band application of urea or controlled-release urea fertilizers

  • W. Cheng
  • Y. Nakajima
  • S. Sudo
  • H. Akiyama
  • H. Tsuruta

Abstract

A field experiment was conducted in an Andosol in Tsukuba, Japan to study the effect of banded fertilizer applications or reduced rate of fertilizer N (20% less) on emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), and also crop yields of Chinese cabbage during the growing season in 2000. Six treatments were applied by randomized design with three replications, which were; no N fertilizer (CK); broadcast application of urea (BC); band application of urea (B); band application of urea at a rate 20% lower than B (BL); band application of controlled-release urea (CB) and band application of controlled-release urea at a rate 20% lower than CB (CBL). The results showed that reduced application rates, applied in bands, of both urea (BL) and controlled-release urea fertilizer (CBL) produced yields that were not significantly lower than yields from the full rate of broadcast urea (BC). The emissions of N2O and NO from the reduced fertilizer treatments (BL, CBL) were lower than that of normal fertilizer rates (B, CB). N2O and NO emissions from controlled-release urea applied in band mode (CB, CBL) were less than those from urea applied in band mode (B, BL). The total emissions of N2O and NO indicated that applying fertilizers in band mode mitigated NO emission from soils, but N2O emissions from banded urea (B) were no lower than from broadcast urea (BC).

band fertilizer application controlled-release urea nitric oxide nitrous oxide reduced fertilizer N rate 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Cheng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Nakajima
    • 1
  • S. Sudo
    • 1
  • H. Akiyama
    • 1
  • H. Tsuruta
    • 1
  1. 1.Greenhouse Gas Emission TeamNIAESTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Institute for Soil and FertilizerAnhui Academy of Agri-SciencesHefei AnhuiChina

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