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Systemic Practice and Action Research

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 523–533 | Cite as

Action Research in Management—Ethical Dilemmas

  • Beverly Walker
  • Tim Haslett
Article

Abstract

This paper discusses the application of the guiding ethical principles for the conduct of research involving human subjects in an action research project in a membership-based community psychiatric disability organization. Action research is a collaborative process of critical inquiry between the researcher and the people in the situation, in this case the management executive. The relationship between the researcher and manager participants in a long-term action research project gives rise to ethical dilemmas related to participant selection and voluntary participation, informed consent, decision making, anonymity and confidentiality, conflicting and different needs. The process and strategies implemented to address them are discussed.

management–ethics action research nonprofit organization 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beverly Walker
    • 1
  • Tim Haslett
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ManagementMonash UniversityCaulfieldAustralia

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