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Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 31–35 | Cite as

Increased root initiation in cuttings of Eucalyptus nitens by delayed auxin application.

  • G.A. LuckmanEmail author
  • R.C. Menary
Article

Abstract

Root initiation in cuttings of Eucalyptus nitens(Deane & Maiden) Maiden. was stimulated by application of auxin dips in theform of 20 mg/l solution administered for 48 h. Thegreatest stimulation of rooting was obtained when auxin was applied to thecuttings at least four weeks after the cuttings were first collected and set ona mist-bed.

Auxin application Cuttings Eucalyptus nitens Root initiation Vegetative propagation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural ResearchUniversity of TasmaniaNew TownAustralia (
  2. 2.Agricultural Science DepartmentUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia

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