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Euphytica

, Volume 128, Issue 2, pp 249–259 | Cite as

Identification of QTLs for BYDV tolerance in bread wheat

  • Ligia Ayala
  • Monique Henry
  • Maarten van Ginkel
  • Ravi Singh
  • Beat Keller
  • Mireille Khairallah
Article

Abstract

We searched for QTLs involved in tolerance to barley yellow dwarf (BYD), a serious viral disease of small grain cereals in two wheat populations, Opata × Synthetic (ITMI)and Frontana × INIA66 (F × I), for which marker data had previously been generated. The populations were evaluated in replicated field trials under artificial inoculation with a BYDV-PAV-Mex isolate and under disease-free conditions. Disease symptoms (yellowing, dwarfism and biomass reduction) were visually recorded and agronomic traits (number of tillers,height, biomass, yield and thousand-kernel weight) were measured on five plants per plot. Phenotypic data on all evaluated traits showed normal distribution with high correlation between visual estimates and measured values. Heritabilities were mostly moderate to high in the 114 lines of the ITMI population, and from low to moderate in the 117 lines of the F × I population. QTL analyses were based on genetic maps containing 443 loci for the ITMI population and 317 loci for the F × I population. Using composite interval mapping, 22 QTLs in the ITMI population and seven in the F × I population were detected, explaining9.8–43.3% of total phenotypic variation (σ2 P)per agronomic trait in the first population, and 4.1–13.7% in the second. Individual QTLs explained less than 15.8%of σ2 P. In the F × I population a minor QTL explaining 7% of σ2 P for yellowing was detected on the short arm of 7D, linked to leaf tip necrosis, a morphological marker for linked genes Bdv1, Yr18 andLr34. A QTL consistently detected for several traits on 2D in the ITMI population and on the short arm of group 6 chromosome(6S) in F × I explained 10–15% of σ2 P. The large number of QTLs having mostly small effects and the continuous distribution of all evaluated traits confirmed the polygenic nature and complexity of BYD tolerance in wheat.

barley yellow dwarf BYDV Bdv1 quantitative trait loci virus tolerance wheat 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ligia Ayala
    • 1
  • Monique Henry
    • 1
  • Maarten van Ginkel
    • 1
  • Ravi Singh
    • 1
  • Beat Keller
    • 2
  • Mireille Khairallah
    • 1
  1. 1.International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)Mexico, D.F.Mexico
  2. 2.Institute of Plant BiologyUniversity of ZurichZurichSwitzerland

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