Journal of Insect Behavior

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 37–45

Nest Defense Behavior in Colonies from Crosses Between Africanized and European Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

  • Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman
  • Anita Collins
  • Joseph H. Martin
  • Justin O. Schmidt
  • Hayward G. Spangler
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1020862432087

Cite this article as:
DeGrandi-Hoffman, G., Collins, A., Martin, J.H. et al. Journal of Insect Behavior (1998) 11: 37. doi:10.1023/A:1020862432087

Abstract

Honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies with either European or Africanized queens mated to European or Africanized drones alone or in combination were tested for defensive behavior using a breath test. The most defensive colonies were those with European or Africanized queens mated to Africanized drones. In colonies where both European and Africanized patrilines existed, most of the workers participating in nest defense behavior for the first 30 s after a disturbance were of African patrilines. Nest defense behavior appears to be genetically dominant in honey bees.

colony defense Africanized honey bees behavioral genetics patriline reciprocal hybrids subfamily 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman
    • 1
  • Anita Collins
    • 2
  • Joseph H. Martin
    • 1
  • Justin O. Schmidt
    • 1
  • Hayward G. Spangler
    • 1
  1. 1.Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, USDA-ARSTucson
  2. 2.Honey Bee Laboratory, USDA-ARS, BARC-EastBeltsville

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