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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 108, Issue 8, pp 815–820 | Cite as

Sequencing of Australian Grapevine Viroid and Yellow Speckle Viroid Isolated from a Tunisian Grapevine without Passage in an Indicator Plant

  • Amine Elleuch
  • Hatem Fakhfakh
  • Martin Pelchat
  • Patricia Landry
  • Mohamed Marrakchi
  • Jean-Pierre PerreaultEmail author
Article

Abstract

We report the nucleotide sequences of Australian Grapevine Viroid and Grapevine Yellow Speckle Viroid (type 1) isolated from grapevine trees in a Tunisian vineyard. Our data confirm the worldwide spread of these viroids and record their occurrence in Africa. This is the first description of Australian Grapevine Viroid sequences isolated from its natural host. Moreover, the sequences of these new natural variants suggests that the previous use of an indicator plant to amplify a viroid does not alter its nucleotide composition. In addition, we also present several new features of these two distinct quasi-species.

indicator plant nucleotide sequence quasi-species viroid 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amine Elleuch
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hatem Fakhfakh
    • 2
  • Martin Pelchat
    • 1
  • Patricia Landry
    • 1
  • Mohamed Marrakchi
    • 2
  • Jean-Pierre Perreault
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.RNA group/Groupe ARN, Département de biochimie, Faculté de médecineUniversité de SherbrookeSherbrookeCanada
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Génétique moléculaire, Immunologie et Biotechnologie, Faculté des Sciences de TunisUniversité de Tunis, ElManarTunisTunisie

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