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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 24, Issue 12, pp 2059–2078 | Cite as

Sex Pheromone of Apple Blotch Leafminer, Phyllonorycter crataegella, and Its Effect on P. mespilella Pheromone Communication

  • Patricia Ferrao
  • Gerhard Gries
  • Priyantha D. C. Wimalaratne
  • Chris T. Maier
  • Regine Gries
  • Keith N. Slessor
  • Jianxiong Li
Article

Abstract

(Z)-10,(Z)-12-Tetradecadienyl acetate (Z10,Z12–14:OAc) and (E)-10,(E)-12-tetradecadienyl acetate (E10,E12–14:OAc) are sex pheromone components of the apple blotch leafminer (ABLM), Phyllonorycter crataegella. Compounds extracted from female pheromone glands were identified by coupled gas chromatographic–electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) analyses, retention index calculations of EAD-active compounds, and by comparative GC-EAD analyses of female ABLM-produced and authentic (synthetic) compounds. In field experiments in apple Malus domestica orchards in Connecticut, Z10,Z12–14:OAc alone attracted ABLM males. Addition of E10,E12–14:OAc to Z10,Z12–14:OAc at 0.1:10 or 1:10 ratios enhanced attractiveness of the lure. Geometrical isomers Z10,E12- or E10,Z12–14:OAc at equivalent ratios were behaviorally benign and slightly inhibitory, respectively. In field experiments in British Columbia, Z10,Z12–14:OAc plus E10,E12–14:OAc did not attract Phyllonorycter moths, supporting the contention that ABLM is not present in the fruit growing regions of British Columbia. Z10,Z12–14:OAc added to P. mespilella pheromone, (E)-4,(E)-10-dodecadienyl acetate, strongly inhibited response by P. mespilella males. Recognition of the ABLM pheromone blend by allopatric P. mespilella males suggests a phylogenetic relationship and previous sympatry of these two Phyllonorycter spp. If pheromonal attraction of ABLM males were reciprocally inhibited by P. mespilella pheromone, a generic Phyllonorycter pheromone blend could be tested for pheromone-based mating disruption of the apple leaf-mining Phyllonorycter guild in North America.

Lepidoptera Gracillariidae Phyllonorycter crataegella Phyllonorycter mespilella sex pheromone (Z)-10,(Z)-12-tetradecadienyl acetate (E)-10,(E)-12-tetradecadienyl acetate (E)-4,(E)-10-dodecadienyl acetate interspecific effects 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Ferrao
    • 1
  • Gerhard Gries
    • 1
  • Priyantha D. C. Wimalaratne
    • 2
  • Chris T. Maier
    • 3
  • Regine Gries
    • 1
  • Keith N. Slessor
    • 2
  • Jianxiong Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre of Pest Management, Department of Biological SciencesSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Department of ChemistrySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  3. 3.Department of EntomologyThe Connecticut Agricultural Experiment StationNew Haven

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