Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 24, Issue 12, pp 2079–2088 | Cite as

Geographic Variation in Sex Pheromone of Asian Corn Borer, Ostrinia furnacalis, in Japan

  • Yongping Huang
  • Takuma Takanashi
  • Sugihiko Hoshizaki
  • Sadahiro Tatsuki
  • Hiroshi Honda
  • Yutaka Yoshiyasu
  • Yukio Ishikawa

Abstract

Geographic variation in the sex pheromone of the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), was surveyed in populations sampled at four locations ranging from 39.7°N to 32.9°N in Japan. The sex pheromone of the three northern populations was composed of (E)- and (Z)-12-tetradecenyl acetates with a mean E proportion of 36–39%. The southernmost population (Nishigoshi) had the same components but with a significantly higher E composition of 44%. The frequency distribution of the E ratio in the Nishigoshi population exhibited a small peak near 38% and a major peak near 46%. A family-wise analysis of the sex pheromone of this population confirmed that there were two distinct phenotypes regarding the E ratio. An “≍46% E strain” inhabits southern parts of Japan, in addition to an “≍38% E strain,” which seems to be predominant in other regions of Japan.

Ostrinia furnacalis sex pheromone (E)-12-tetradecenyl acetate (Z)-12-tetradecenyl acetate field trap experiment geographic variation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yongping Huang
    • 1
  • Takuma Takanashi
    • 1
  • Sugihiko Hoshizaki
    • 1
  • Sadahiro Tatsuki
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Honda
    • 2
  • Yutaka Yoshiyasu
    • 3
  • Yukio Ishikawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Applied Entomology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Agriculture and ForestryUniversity of TsukubaTsukubaJapan
  3. 3.Laboratory of EntomologyKyoto Prefectural UniversityJapan

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