Journal of Protein Chemistry

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 187–192 | Cite as

Biosynthesis and Characterization of 4-Fluorotryptophan-Labeled Escherichia coli Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase

  • Qing-shuo Zhang
  • Li Shen
  • En-duo Wang
  • Ying-lai Wang
Article

Abstract

Escherichia coli 4-fluorotryptophan-substituted arginyl-tRNA synthetase was biosynthetically prepared and purified from a tryptophan auxotroph which could overproduce this enzyme. A method was developed to separate 4-fluorotryptophan from tryptophan and to determine accurately their contents in the 4-fluorotryptophan-containing proteins. It was confirmed that more than 95% of the tryptophan residues in the purified 4-fluorotryptophan-substituted arginyl-tRNA synthetase were replaced by 4-fluorotryptophan. Studies on the effect of the 4-fluorotryptophan replacement on properties of the enzyme showed that, when compared with the native enzyme, both the specific activity and the first-order rate constant of the fluorinated enzyme decreased by approximately 20% with just slightly higher Km values. CD studies, however, did not reveal any difference between the secondary structure of the native and fluorinated enzymes. In addition, thermal unfolding studies showed that the 4-fluorotryptophan replacement did not significantly affect the thermal stability of the enzyme. We may conclude that the substitution of 4-fluorotryptophan in arginyl-tRNA synthetase had no substantial effect on the structure and function of the enzyme. Finally, a preliminary study of 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the fluorinated enzyme has shown promising prospect for further investigation of its structure and function with NMR.

Arginyl-tRNA synthetase 4-fluorotryptophan 19F NMR HPLC 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qing-shuo Zhang
    • 1
  • Li Shen
    • 1
  • En-duo Wang
    • 1
  • Ying-lai Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Molecular BiologyShanghai Institute of Biochemistry, Academia SinicaShanghaiP. R. China

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