International Urology and Nephrology

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 631–633 | Cite as

Squamous and/or glandular differentiation in urothelial carcinoma: Prevalence and significance in transurethral resections of the bladder

  • Athanase Billis
  • André A. Schenka
  • Carolos C.O. Ramos
  • Luciana T. Carneiro
  • Valquiria Araújo
Article

Abstract

Background: It is controversial if urothelial carcinoma of the bladder with squamous and/or glandular differentiation is a more aggressive neoplasm than conventional urothelial carcinoma. Design: A total of 165 transurethral resections of the bladder were reviewed. A group with squamous and//or glandular differentiation was compared to a group without this finding. The qui-square test was used to assess the association of the groups with stage (TNM, 1997).Results: Of the total of 165 transurethral resections of the bladder, 153 (92.72%) were conventional urothelial carcinomas and 12 (7.27%) showed squamous and/or glandular differentiation. The distribution according to stage was 84 (54.9%), 35 (22.9%) and 34 (22.2%) for the group without differentiation and 0 (0%) 3 (25%) and 9 (75%) for the group with squamous and/or glandular differentiation, respectively for stages pTa, pT1 and pT2. Tumors with squamous and/or glandular differentiation showed a significant statistical correlation to higher stage at clinical presentation (p <0.0001). There was no significant statistical relation according to age (p = 0.8433), sex (p = 0.5672) or race (p = 0.3137). Conclusions: The results suggest that urothelial bladder carcinomas with squamous and/or glandular differentiation are more aggressive neoplasms. There was a significant statistical correlation between tumors with this differentiation and higher stage at clinical presentation.

Squamous and/or glandular differentiation TUR Urinary bladder Urothelial carcinoma 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Athanase Billis
    • 1
  • André A. Schenka
    • 1
  • Carolos C.O. Ramos
    • 1
  • Luciana T. Carneiro
    • 1
  • Valquiria Araújo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomic Pathology, School of MedicineState University of Campinas (UNICAMP)CampinasBrazil

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