Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 397–422 | Cite as

Efficacy of Sensory and Motor Interventions for Children with Autism

  • Grace T. Baranek
Article

Abstract

Idiosyncratic responses to sensory stimuli and unusual motor patterns have been reported clinically in young children with autism. The etiology of these behavioral features is the subject of much speculation. Myriad sensory- and motor-based interventions have evolved for use with children with autism to address such issues; however, much controversy exists about the efficacy of such therapies. This review paper summarizes the sensory and motor difficulties often manifested in autism, and evaluates the scientific basis of various sensory and motor interventions used with this population. Implications for education and further research are described.

Sensorimotor therapies evidence-based treatments sensory integration 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grace T. Baranek
    • 1
  1. 1.The Clinical Center for the Study of Development and LearningChapel Hill

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