Media Publicity and the Voluntary Sector: The Case of Nonprofit Organizations in New York City

  • Ronald N. Jacobs
  • Daniel J. Glass
Article

Abstract

Media publicity is an important resource for contemporary voluntary associations, but very little is actually known about the resources and organizational characteristics that are most important for getting media attention. To address this question, we collected and analyzed data on the organizational attributes and news publicity of 739 nonprofit organizations in New York City. We find that an organization's income, paid staff, membership size, and library resources are significantly related to getting media publicity, whereas the number of chapter affiliations is inversely related to publicity. Association type is also a significant factor that influences an organization's ability to get publicity. We discuss the implications that these findings have for current debates about advocacy and civic engagement in the nonprofit sector.

Media publicity nonprofit advocacy New York City 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Third-Sector Research and The Johns Hopkins University 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald N. Jacobs
    • 1
  • Daniel J. Glass
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity at Albany, State University of New YorkAlbany

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