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Marketing Letters

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 297–305 | Cite as

Consumer Control and Empowerment: A Primer

  • Luc Wathieu
  • Lyle Brenner
  • Ziv Carmon
  • Amitava Chattopadhyay
  • Klaus Wertenbroch
  • Aimee Drolet
  • John Gourville
  • A. V. Muthukrishnan
  • Nathan Novemsky
  • Rebecca K. Ratner
  • George Wu
Article

Abstract

This paper introduces consumer empowerment as a promising research area. Going beyond lay wisdom that more control is always better, we outline several hypotheses concerning (a) the factors that influence the perception of empowerment, and (b) the consequences of greater control and the subjective experience of empowerment on consumer satisfaction and confidence.

consumer control empowerment information technology choice process social comparison satisfaction 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luc Wathieu
    • 1
  • Lyle Brenner
    • 2
  • Ziv Carmon
    • 3
  • Amitava Chattopadhyay
    • 3
  • Klaus Wertenbroch
    • 3
  • Aimee Drolet
    • 4
  • John Gourville
    • 1
  • A. V. Muthukrishnan
    • 5
  • Nathan Novemsky
    • 6
  • Rebecca K. Ratner
    • 7
  • George Wu
    • 8
  1. 1.Harvard Business SchoolUSA
  2. 2.University of FloridaUSA
  3. 3.INSEADUSA
  4. 4.Anderson School at UCLAUSA
  5. 5.Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong Kong
  6. 6.Yale School of ManagementUSA
  7. 7.University of North CarolinaUSA
  8. 8.University of ChicagoUSA

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