Journal of Behavioral Education

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 181–190 | Cite as

Using Mnemonics to Increase Early Literacy Skills in Urban Kindergarten Students

  • Valerie Agramonte
  • Phillip J. Belfiore
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an integrated mnemonics strategy on consonant letter naming and consonant sound production on three kindergarten students at-risk for academic failure. Flashcards were developed where the target capital letter was enhanced and imbedded as part of the known picture (e.g., the letter D as the doorknob on a door, the letter F as the flag and flagpole). The mnemonic strategy was assessed using a multiple baseline across students design. Results showed that all three students increased in both the number of consonants named and the number of consonant sounds produced. In addition, all three students maintained performance at the 1 and 3 week followup. Also, based on a pre- and post-assessment, 2 students demonstrated generalization to the ability to name words beginning with consonants letter-sound learned.

mnemonics literacy alphabet urban education 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valerie Agramonte
  • Phillip J. Belfiore

There are no affiliations available

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