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Journal of Traumatic Stress

, Volume 15, Issue 5, pp 369–375 | Cite as

Effect of Political Imprisonment and Trauma History on Recent Tibetan Refugees in India

  • Antonella Crescenzi
  • Eva Ketzer
  • Mark Van Ommeren
  • Kalsang Phuntsok
  • Ivan Komproe
  • Joop T. V. M. de Jong
Article

Abstract

We sought to examine the impact of political imprisonment on anxiety, depression, and somatic symptoms reported by newly arrived Tibetan refugees in Dharamsala, India. We used the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 to compare 76 previously imprisoned with 74 never imprisoned recent Tibetan refugees. Previously imprisoned refugees reported more traumatic events, especially torture and deprivation. Previously imprisoned refugees reported more anxiety than nonimprisoned refugees, but the groups were similarly high in terms of depression and number of somatic complaints. According to assessment with the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, 20% of the tortured and imprisoned refugees met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder.

India imprisonment refugees Tibet trauma 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonella Crescenzi
    • 1
  • Eva Ketzer
    • 1
  • Mark Van Ommeren
    • 2
  • Kalsang Phuntsok
    • 1
  • Ivan Komproe
    • 2
  • Joop T. V. M. de Jong
    • 2
  1. 1.Tibetan Transcultural Psychosocial Organization Mental Health Program, Department of Health, Central Tibetan AdministrationDharamsala, Himachal PradeshIndia
  2. 2.Transcultural Psychological OrganizationVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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