Annals of Operations Research

, Volume 81, Issue 0, pp 433–466 | Cite as

Assignment and sequencing models for thescheduling of process systems

  • Jose M. Pinto
  • Ignacio E. Grossmann
Article

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of assignment and sequencing models that are used inthe scheduling of process operations with mathematical programming techniques. Althoughscheduling models are problem specific, there are common features which translate intosimilar types of constraints. Two major categories of scheduling models are identified:single-unit assignment models in which the assignment of tasks to units is known a priori,and multiple-unit assignment models in which several machines compete for the processingof products. The most critical modeling issues are the time domain representation and networkstructure of the processing plant. Furthermore, a summary of the major features of thescheduling model is presented along with computational experience, as well as a discussionon their strengths and limitations.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jose M. Pinto
  • Ignacio E. Grossmann

There are no affiliations available

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