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Somatic Cell and Molecular Genetics

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 185–189 | Cite as

Brief Communication: Genomics of the Human Genes Encoding Four TAFII Subunits of TFIID, the Three Subunits of TFIIA, as well as CDK8 and SURB7

  • C. Di Pietro
  • A. Rapisarda
  • C. Bonaiuto
  • M. N. Lizzio
  • H. Engel
  • V. Amico
  • M. Scalia
  • A. Amato
  • K.-H. Grzeschik
  • G. Sichel
  • M. Purrello
Article

Abstract

By in situ chromosomal hybridization, and by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analysis, we have determined the genomic position of the human genes encoding four TAFII subunits of TFIID (TAFII150, TAFII105, TAFII68, TAFII18), the three subunits of TFIIA (TFIIA35 and TFIIA19, both encoded by the same gene, and TFIIA12), CDK8, and SURB7. All of these proteins are bona fide components of human class II holoenzymes as well as targets of signal transduction pathways that regulate genome expression. The genes encoding them are present in the human genome in a single copy and are localized at 8q23, 18q11.2, 17q11.1–11.2, 1p21, 14q31, 15q21–23, 13q12, and 12p12, respectively. We have mapped all of them to chromosomal regions where hereditary genetic diseases have been localized or which are involved in malignancies, which makes them potential candidates for a causal involvement in these phenotypes.

Keywords

Signal Transduction Human Genome Somatic Cell Genetic Disease Transduction Pathway 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Di Pietro
    • 1
  • A. Rapisarda
    • 1
  • C. Bonaiuto
    • 2
  • M. N. Lizzio
    • 1
  • H. Engel
    • 3
  • V. Amico
    • 1
  • M. Scalia
    • 1
  • A. Amato
    • 4
  • K.-H. Grzeschik
    • 3
  • G. Sichel
    • 1
  • M. Purrello
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Biologia generale, cellulare e di Genetica molecolareUniversità di CataniaCataniaItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Patologia generaleUniversità di CataniaCataniaItaly
  3. 3.Medizinisches Zentrum für HumangenetikPhilipps UniversitätMarburgGermany
  4. 4.Istituto di Biologia generaleUniversitá di messinaMessinaItaly

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