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Catalysis Letters

, Volume 70, Issue 3–4, pp 99–107 | Cite as

High yields of synthesis gas by millisecond partial oxidation of higher hydrocarbons

  • R.P. O'Connor
  • E.J. Klein
  • L.D. Schmidt
Article

Abstract

Cyclohexane, n-hexane, and isooctane were reacted with air in a Rh-monolith reactor and converted into synthesis gas (H2+CO) in yields exceeding 90%, with >95% conversion of fuels and 100% conversion of oxygen. The best catalyst was an 80 ppi washcoated alumina monolith containing 5 wt% Rh. There was a small effect of catalyst contact time on syngas selectivity and conversions for gas space velocities from 3×105 to 3×106 h−1. Preheating the feed enhances syngas selectivities slightly, but no reactor preheat is necessary provided the fuel remains vaporized. Addition of 25 mol% toluene to isooctane also produces syngas, olefins, and methane with 90% yield, including ∼70% yield to syngas. Partial oxidation of gasoline–air mixtures was attempted but the catalysts were poisoned after several hours, probably by sulfur and/or metals.

syngas millisecond partial oxidation Rh-monolith reactor hydrocarbon fuels isooctane gasoline 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • R.P. O'Connor
    • 1
  • E.J. Klein
    • 1
  • L.D. Schmidt
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials ScienceUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials ScienceUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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