Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 251–269

Comparing Practice Patterns of Consumer and Non-Consumer Mental Health Service Providers

  • Robert Paulson
  • Heidi Herinckx
  • Jean Demmler
  • Greg Clarke
  • David Cutler
  • Elizabeth Birecree
Article

Abstract

The practice patterns of consumer andnon-consumer providers of assertive community treatmentare compared using both quantitative and qualitativedata collected as part of a randomized trial. Activity log data showed that there were few substantivedifferences in the pattern of either the administrativeor direct service tasks performed by the two teams. Incontrast, the qualitative data revealed that there were discernable differences in the“culture” of the two teams. The consumerteam “culture” emphasized “beingthere” with the client while the non-consumer teamwas more concerned with accomplishing tasks.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Paulson
  • Heidi Herinckx
  • Jean Demmler
  • Greg Clarke
  • David Cutler
  • Elizabeth Birecree

There are no affiliations available

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