BT Technology Journal

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 33–41 | Cite as

Spatial audio technology for telepresence

  • M P Hollier
  • A N Rimmell
  • D Burraston
Article

Abstract

As people start to exploit new telepresence technologies to meet and work, they will be able to exploit all of their senses as they transmit, receive, and monitor information. An essential part of such three-dimensional spaces is the audio landscape. People are able to detect a wide variety of sounds and separate them in space. Spatial separation improves the detection and intelligibility of speech from multiple talkers, and enables simultaneous monitoring of multiple information streams through the use of multiple alert sounds. On-going research at BT Laboratories into spatial audio has resulted in a number of leading edge demonstrations and patent applications. This paper introduces the technologies employed to create spatial audio for real-time synthetic worlds including single and multiple users, and non-ideal acoustic environments.

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Copyright information

© British Telecommunications 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • M P Hollier
    • 1
  • A N Rimmell
    • 1
  • D Burraston
    • 1
  1. 1.BT LaboratoriesIpswich, SuffolkEngland

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